Re: Deconstruction: any examples?

>X-News: vaxa bit.mo.design-l:874
>
>>From: david sucher <[email protected]>
>>Subject:RE: Deconstruction: any examples?
>>Date: Thu, 17 Mar 1994 08:34:44 -0800
>>Message-ID:<[email protected]>
>
>>> > Bryan L. Bowen ([email protected]) wrote: (at least I think it was
>>Bowen: it's hard to tell when the messages are nested)
>>
>>> > : Check out Bernard Tschumi's "Park de Violette">
>>But it's interesting that the feelings that this writer describes as being
>>provoked by the Parc is a 'disquieting sense of instability.' Odd thing
>>for a park to do. I'll go see it and so suspend judgement on the actual
>>work; but I can drive around Seattle and get much the same feelings of
>>disquiet and instability right now! ;-)
>>
>>Cheers,
>>David Sucher
>
>Although I've never been there, I have heard that the Parc is severely under-
>utilized, indeed almost devoid of humanity. It appears that the 'disquieting
>sense of instability' has been rejected by those for whom, presumably, the
>park was designed.
>Barbara Kelly
>[email protected]

I've been there on several occassions--each time on a week day--and it's
always been very well used. Playing football on the lawns, older folk
playing bocci under the trees, people sunbathing, eating in the cafes, and
children racing their bikes up and down one of the Follies and swarming
over the large playground. Just like any other Parisian Park; grass is
grass, chair are chairs, playgrounds are playgrounds, and as far as using
them it doesn't matter much if they're in a 19th Century Pastoral park like
Central Park in NYC or arranged according to an urban logic (the grid and
avenues which in plan seem "disquieting" actually extend the urban fabric
and structure into the park instead of separating the two realms a la
Olmsted and Central Park. I suspect the perception that it isn't well used
comes from the architectural photographs devoid of people and people
looking to discredit Mitterand, Tschumi, and anything that challenges our
notions of 19th Century pastoral parks.
Jory Johnson
University of Illinois
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