ARCHITECTURE: Transit Village. California. Housing.

From: IN%"URBAN-L%[email protected]" "Urban Planning Discussion List"
23-MAR-1994 01:35:59.54
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Subj: RE: Transit Village bill, California

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Date: Tue, 22 Mar 1994 21:56:24 -0800
From: david sucher <[email protected]>
Subject: RE: Transit Village bill, California
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This is a very interesting bill. It attempts to help further the
development of a new (or old) style of settlement. Some interesting items
in the last several paragraph, I think.

David Sucher


---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Tue, 22 Mar 1994 21:08:55 -0800 (PST)
From: "Matthew J. Williams" <[email protected]>
To: [email protected]
Subject: Re: Transit Village bill, California (fwd)

BILL NUMBER: AB 3152 INTRODUCED 02/23/94
BILL TEXT
INTRODUCED BY Assembly Member Bates
FEBRUARY 23, 1994
An act to add Article 5 (commencing with Section 33299) to
Chapter 3 of Part 1 of Division 24 of the Health and Safety
Code, relating to land use.
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST

AB 3152, as introduced, Bates. Land use: Transit Village Development
Act of 1994.

Existing law, known as the Community Redevelopment Law, authorizes the
establishm ent of redevelopment agencies in communities to address the
effects of blight, as defined, in blighted areas of those communities
known as project areas.

This bill would enact the Transit Village Development Act of 1994. The
act would express various findings and declarations of the Legislature regarding
the use o f rail transit in California and related issues. The bill would
authorize the es tablishment of transit village development districts,
which would consist of all land within a quarter-mile radius of a rail
transit station designated by the Gov ernor, upon application by the
legislative body of the city, county, or city and county that has
jurisdiction over the station area and that has established a red
evelopment agency. The bill would specify that a transit village
development dis trict would possess the powers of a redevelopment agency
established pursuant to the Community Redevelopment Law. The bill would
require that a transit village development district be administered by the
legislative body and staff of the redevelopment agency in the jurisdiction
in which it is located.

Vote: majority. Appropriation: no. Fiscal committee:
yes. State-mandated local program: no.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION 1. Article 5 (commencing with Section 33299) is added to Chapter
3 of P art 1 of Division 24 of the Health and Safety Code, to read:

Article 5. Transit Village Development Act of 1994
33299. This act shall be known, and may be cited, as the Transit
Village Deve lopment Act of 1994.
33299.1. The Legislature hereby finds and declares all of the
following:
(a) Federal, state, and local governments in California are investing
in new a nd expanded rail transit systems in areas throughout the state,
including Los Ang eles County, the San Francisco Bay area, San Diego
County, Santa Clara County, an d Sacramento County.
(b) This public investment in rail transit is unrivaled in the state's histor
y
and represents well over ten billion dollars ($10,000,000,000) in planned
invest ment alone.
(c) Recent studies of transit ridership in California indicate that
persons wh
o live within a quarter-mile radius of rail transit stations utilize the
transit system in far greater numbers than does the general public.
(d) The use of transit by persons living near rail transit stations is
particu larly important given the decline of transit ridership in
California between 1980
and 1990. Transit's share of commute trips dropped in all California
metropolit an areas--greater Los Angeles: 5.4 percent to 4.8 percent; San
Francisco Bay Are a: 11.9 percent to 10.0 percent; San Diego: 3.7 percent
to 3.6 percent; Sacramen to: 3.7 percent to 2.5 percent.
(e) Currently, only a small number of rail transit stations in
California have any concentration of housing proximate to the station.
(f) Interest in clustering housing and commercial development around
rail tran sit stations, called transit villages, has gained momentum in
recent years. An i deal transit village has all of the following
characteristics:
(1) It is a neighborhood centered around a transit station that is
planned and
designed so that residents, workers, shoppers, and others find it
convenient and
attractive to patronize transit.
(2) It has a mix of housing types, including apartments, within a
quarter-mile
radius of the transit station.
(3) It contains other land uses, including a retail district oriented
to the transit stop and civic uses, such as schools and libraries.
(4) It invites pedestrian and bicycle access to the transit station,
with attr actively designed and landscaped pathways.
(5) It provides demonstrable public benefits beyond the increase in
transit us age, including all of the following:
(A) Relief of traffic congestion.
(B) Improved air quality.
(C) Increased transit revenue yields.
(D) Increased stock of affordable housing.
(E) Redevelopment of depressed and marginal inner-city neighborhoods.
(F) Live-travel options for transit-needy groups.
(G) Promotion of infilling and preservation of natural resources.
(g) To increase rail transit ridership and to reduce vehicle traffic on
the hi ghways, the state government should direct new development close to
the transit s tations and away from other existing neighborhoods. Doing
so will require an agg ressive program of financial incentives and land
assembly powers similar to those
now utilized by redevelopment districts.
33299.3. (a) (1) A transit village development district shall consist
of all land within a quarter-mile radius of a rail transit station
designated by the Gov ernor, upon application by the legislative body of a
city, county, or city and co unty that has jurisdiction over the station
area and that has established a redev elopment agency pursuant to this
part.
(2) For purposes of this article, "district" means a transit village
developme nt district as defined in paragraph (1).
(b) A district shall have all of the powers possessed by a
redevelopment agenc y established pursuant to this part, including, but
not limited to, the powers of
land assembly and tax increment financing. These powers shall be
available to d istricts in order to concentrate development, particularly
housing, within the di strict.
(c) A district shall be entitled to first priority for available
funding for i nnovative federal transit and land use programs in
California in which the state has discretionary authority.
(d) A district shall be administered by the legislative body and staff
of the redevelopment agency of the jurisdiction in which it is located.
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